Posts Categorized: LOG

Exploring Core Values

Posted by & filed under General, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Core Values Kids Smiling

These are Mount Hermon’s core values that drive “the how” behind the calling of Lives Transformed. Beyond creating a filter and a standard for what happens here, they reflect the heart and desire of what we have been called to do.

Relational
We engage in purposeful, deep, and enduring relationships as an intentional, Christ-like community.

Authentic
We align our faith, passion, attitude, and conduct, drawing closer to Jesus in humility and transparency

Excellent

We work individually and collectively to achieve the highest quality for the best Kingdom outcomes.

Grace-filled

We share a redemptive, restorative, and abundant love that is kind and patient in application.

The following series of stories capture these core values and are examples of how impact at Mount Hermon isn’t just limited to sessions with a speaker, but rather an all-encompassing experience where people are met right where they are on their journey.

The Authentic and Relational core values stand out in the story about Lorents, 61-year-old college teacher raised in another religion, intrigued by conversations regarding “answered prayer.”

In Adam’s story, the core values of Grace-filled and Relational drive the astounding outcome of an adventure staffer who at a young age had to stare death in the face.

Natalie’s story about how participating in the Echo program dramatically redirected her life shows our Relational value at work through the effectiveness of Excellent programs.

Mount Hermon’s core values extend beyond just those who work here! You’ll read about two Associates who grabbed on to the Relational and Authentic values so much that they invested in the lives of someone just down the street from Mount Hermon.

And last but not least, is a story about the incredible impact a devotional book is having in the lives of students. This story captures the Excellence value of the youth programs thinking beyond a student’s week or weekend at camp and Authentic as we hope and pray that students, while they are here and when they return home, will take steps in making their faith their own.

As you read these stories, we are curious to know how your encounters with God at Mount Hermon have impacted and transformed your life. We would love to hear about it!

Submit your story of life transformation at stories@mounthermon.org

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The Circle of Life & Love

Posted by & filed under LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Forest Image

We’ve all heard the phrase, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas.” Well, nothing could be further from the truth at Mount Hermon. Our hope and mission is to spread the love of our Savior everywhere we go—in our homes, to our family and friends, in our workplaces, churches and throughout our communities.

There is no doubt that God has made Mount Hermon a unique sanctuary in today’s world. A muchneeded respite from the culture we live in, where we can hear His voice and see the beauty of His creation all around us. Those of us that love Mount Hermon want others to realize the experience of meeting Jesus in this place.

Such is this story from Steve and Jane; a wonderful, Christ-loving couple who want to share Jesus and Mount Hermon with those who don’t know either one of them—yet.

“On our way to a weekend concert at Mount Hermon, we stopped at a local coffee shop for lunch. We placed our order, then found out they only accept cash. We stood there figuring out what we could get based on how much money we had to tide us over until the huge Mount Hermon dinner that awaited us later. The young man behind the counter pulled out his wallet to pay for our lunch; his name was Gordon. What an utterly sweet gesture but we couldn’t let him do it. After we had sat at our table, I found a twenty in my purse, so we were able to get the rest of our lunch.

As I talked with Gordon, we learned he had never been to Mount Hermon, even though he works right at the base of Conference Drive! I told him about the conferences and the Redwood Canopy Tour. He was very excited to hear about them and said he would like to take his brother.

I so wanted Gordon to be able to go but thought he might have trouble paying for it. I went ahead and bought two tickets for the Redwood Canopy Tour. Just a couple of weeks later when we were back at Mount Hermon, I took them down to him and thanked him for his kind gesture. He was flabbergasted, so excited and grateful. My heart’s desire is that Mount Hermon will draw Gordon in, and ultimately into the kingdom.”

This is a beautiful example of the circle of life and love at Mount Hermon. People come here and through Jesus’ love their life is impacted and transformed. Then, they want others to experience that same love, so they reach out and invite someone new into their own Mount Hermon experience. You may be one of the many who have shared Mount Hermon with someone you care for, or maybe like Steve and Jane, a stranger crossed your path and the Spirit encouraged you to share. Either way, thank you. Keep ‘em coming, we have a big world to reach.

“Your love for one another will prove to the world that you are my disciples.” John 13:35 (NLT)

Would you say a prayer for Gordon and his brother that the seeds that were planted are growing? Thank you!

The Difference

Posted by & filed under Associates, General, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Caroline Family

Every summer countless stories about how God transforms lives at Mount Hermon begin to pour in. We have the privilege to see Truth revealed in people’s lives over and over and over again through these stories. It is a reassuring confirmation that what happens at Mount Hermon makes a difference.

Woven around each and every story we hear are the components and people that must be in place for our multiple ministry arenas to operate seamlessly and smoothly for these life-transforming encounters to happen.

Let me share a story from a family that attended Family Camp this summer which provides a great example:

“This summer we attended Family Camp with our disabled daughter Caroline who has Angelman Syndrome. Angelman Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual and developmental disability, seizures and jerky movements (especially hand flapping). I just wanted to take a moment to thank you for providing an absolutely amazing week of fellowship, friendship, restoration and love for myself and my family.

“Against all odds, Caroline has learned to walk, although she is not completely steady and cannot do long distances. She doesn’t talk per se, but she does talk to you in her own way; through verbal noises, squeals, laughter or physical touch: patting on the shoulder, pulling hair, pinching… not to be mean…just to elicit a response or your attention. Her seizures are thankfully controlled with daily medication. She has trouble chewing food, so we normally chop up all of her meals or they are a soft, oatmeal consistency. She also puts everything in her mouth, which is why she wears a chewy necklace (in different colors) around her neck at all times. With all of this, we were nervous as to how Caroline would react to so many people in a “Camp” environment and we were nervous as to how everyone at “Camp” would react to her.

Caroline Family Photo

“I was deeply struck by how open, loving and welcoming everyone at Mount Hermon was and your Child Care Staff was absolutely incredible! Miss Koala, Mr. Chief, and Ms. Shannon engaged Caroline in a way that was authentic and not forced. Being with Caroline wasn’t just a “job” for them, they were truly just being themselves and having fun with her making sure to include her in all of the activities and crafts. Mr. Chief would always make sure he had music going for her, and he would dance with her. Even though the other kids asked lots of questions, they seemed to warm up to Caroline quickly. The tearjerker for me happened the last day when each of the children made a shepherd that looked like themselves. One of the little boys pointed out that Caroline’s shepherd needed to have her necklace, so they made her one. Miss Koala even made a staff for Caroline covering it with tape to ensure she could safely chew on it.

“Miss Koala, Mr. Chief, and Ms. Shannon were amazing as they tended to Caroline in such a loving way reflecting patience, leadership, and careful communication.

“I wanted to let you know how touched my husband and I were by the incredible show of support from so many strangers and how thankful we are to have a place to attend that reduces so much of the stress felt by parents traveling with children with disabilities. We are forever grateful for the experience Mount Hermon provided for us. Our relationship with God is stronger and our marriage is stronger than ever. Our hearts were filled with God’s Love and we can’t stop sharing our story with all of our family and friends!”

THIS MAKES THE A DIFFERENCE

Caroline and her family experienced something special and unique for them, yet this is something that happens over and over at Family Camp for families who have a child with special needs. We hire counselors who love children then train them to go the extra mile to accommodate, integrate and lavish these kids with the love of Jesus.

Sometimes accommodating and integrating campers with special needs requires Mount Hermon to assign an individual counselor for the duration of Family Camp. Does that require extra resources? Yes. Does that require additional staff? Yes. Does that make a difference? Yes.

The experience you and your family have at Mount Hermon is important to us and we are committed to providing a place where you can engage God right where you are without distraction. We always want to do whatever it takes to make a difference.

That difference in your experience comes through the Mount Hermon Annual Fund. The Annual Fund covers three main things at Mount Hermon: Camperships, Foundational Capital Projects, and “The Difference.” The Difference is that space between having people on staff and having the right people on staff. The Difference is having the ability to accommodate children with special needs while also providing the needed upkeep for aging and historic buildings, and so much more.

Covering that “difference” is only possible because of the faithful financial support to our annual fund by our Mount Hermon Associates. Mount Hermon Associates make that difference possible each and every day with each and every opportunity that the Lord puts before us.

The Difference takes faith and resources. The same faith and resources that keep the moving parts behind the scenes operating as smoothly as possible along with the countless other unplanned ministry speed bumps that pop-up on a regular basis. All of this and more requires two million dollars per year in ministry support. Simply put, “the difference” between ministry revenue and ministry expenses comes to two million dollars each year.

God provides for this two-million-dollar difference through Mount Hermon Associates. When a roof leaks or an unsafe deck is in need of repair, or a septic system fails or camp vehicles need replacement, or dishwashers wear out or … ministry can be compromised. Situations like these can distract campers from what God has in store for them while they’re at Mount Hermon. Associates make the difference by empowering our ministry and mission to remain focused and strong! Our Associates are not only part of our culture; they’re woven into the fabric of our entire mission touching tens of thousands of lives each and every year.

Steve, a Mount Hermon Associate, shared this at Victory Circle:

“I love Mount Hermon. This is where we come every year to get that refreshment over and over again. I want to encourage you to be an Associate. It will give you an entirely different perspective of Mount Hermon. We are up-to-date on everything, and we receive encouraging messages from Kerry and other staff. I encourage you, if you are not an Associate, become one.”

Steve is right. As a Mount Hermon Associate, you are someone who makes the difference in the lives of those who come here, a true partner in ministry, so we do our best to make sure you’re aware and informed of what God is doing throughout Mount Hermon. Whether it’s Camperships, or being able to minister to those with special needs or tending to facility needs with excellence while allowing the mission to remain strong and growing… God has blessed Mount Hermon in unimaginable ways, and we can’t imagine life at Mount Hermon without the faithful, loving support of our Associates. They truly make “the difference.” THANK YOU!

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Do Any of Us Really Know?

Posted by & filed under General, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Mount Hermon Bridge

“I am a 61-year-old college teacher raised in another religion, but I am a new Christian because of Mount Hermon.” That’s how my conversation started with Lorents, a member of the worship team during JEMS week this summer at Mount Hermon.

The Japanese Evangelical Missionary Society has hosted a conference every year at Mount Hermon since 1950. Young Nisei pastors, who struggled to revive their ministries in California after the traumatic World War II internment, gathered their families and young people from various Christian denominations for the first Nisei Christian Conference in June of the same year. Today, over 1,500 people from throughout the Mainland, Hawaii, Canada and Japan gather at Mount Hermon and various locations in July.

I could hardly believe this man, Lorents clearly beaming with the love of Christ, hadn’t known much about Christianity only a year ago. Here’s his story:

Raised as a Buddhist in a traditional Japanese– American household, Lorents had a friend in Southern California who kept telling them about “this place we go for summer vacations that’s even better than Hawaii.”

Eventually, Lorents told me, “I thought I’d better check this place out!” He was a guest at Mount Hermon for the very first time with his wife and daughter during JEMS week in the summer of 2015.

The beauty of the grounds made a positive initial impression to Lorents. But then he was impressed with the beautiful spirits of the groundskeepers.

“I couldn’t help noticing that the facilities crew, the housekeeping crew, the registration desk, all had the type of smiles and warm, welcoming spirit that you encounter all too infrequently in customer service industries these days. And it went beyond friendliness: they seemed to truly love one another, and love the guests.”

An announcement was made inviting people to go for a morning run on Tuesday, and Lorents, an avid jogger, decided to join in. When he showed up at the post office that morning, the only other person was the staff member leading the run, Bill Fernald.

Runner at Mount HermonBill is the Vice President of Guest Care at Mount Hermon, also an avid jogger. Bill was delighted to take Lorents on a personal jogging tour of the campus. As they ran, Bill casually pointed to building after building, relating the stories behind their existence.

“Maybe he didn’t realize it at the time, but every story he told was about how these buildings were an answer to prayer,” Lorents said. “Bill would point to a building and say, ‘Oh that’s really an answer to prayer.’ Point to another, ‘There’s another answer to prayer!’ That made a big impression. Prayer to me had always been just a ritual.”


“The idea of actually having answers to prayer was revolutionary. I couldn’t stop thinking about it.”


Then Lorents went on the ropes course with his daughter. Again, he was impressed with the courtesy of the staffers there. When he got to the ropes component called “the leap of faith,” his daughter, who had crossed first, kept calling back to him, “Come on Dad, take the leap of faith!” He began to consider whether he was receiving a larger overall message about the direction of his life.

That evening he attended the worship gathering. Lorents said the message of grace the speaker explained appealed to him greatly, “The idea that life is not just about karma, getting what we deserve because of our actions. The problem with karma was that to work off my bad karma, I had to deliberately add good karma, acts of charity and kindness, for example. But, I started to wonder, if I am doing those good deeds for a selfish motive, bettering the condition of my karma, aren’t they tainted with bad karma? Selfishness is the ultimate bad karma. It seemed to me an inescapable trap. Then I realized the apostle Paul was making a very similar argument in his epistles, for grace and against good deeds as a way of salvation.”

At the end of the meeting, the speaker invited people to come forward for prayer. Having just heard from Bill Butterworth about the effectiveness of prayer, Lorents decided to try it out. He turned to his wife and daughter and said, “Let’s go forward!”

When they met with the prayer counselor at the front of the auditorium, they were asked, “What would you like prayer for?” Lorents wasn’t sure. The prayer counselor made some suggestions: “Your marriage? Your health?”

“No,” thought Lorents, “that’s not it.”

“Would you like to invite Jesus Christ into your heart?” That’s it! Lorents bowed his head and was led in a prayer of repentance and salvation.

The counselor then told him to find two or three other men that very evening and tell them what he had done. Lorents did exactly that, and they were thrilled to suggest further spiritual growth steps. They found out where he lived, and recommended a church in his area.

“And today I stand here, exactly one year later, as an enthusiastic follower of Jesus Christ, involved with my local church, being discipled by mature believers, engaged in the worship team—And I didn’t even really know what it meant to accept Christ at the time!” Then he adds with a twinkle in his eye, “Do any of us really know?”


Lorents makes one thing clear to me: “It really wasn’t only a logical argument that persuaded me. It was the big picture of a loving Christian community that I saw for the first time in my life here at Mount Hermon.”

More Than A Mountaintop Experience

Posted by & filed under LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Young Girl with 25 Day ChalleAfter every one of our camp experiences we encourage students to take home a challenge booklet. This summer our challenge booklet contained twentyfive daily lessons designed for students to spend time in the Bible much like they did during camp. The goal is to keep them close to the heart of Jesus and help ensure that their time at camp was much more than a mountaintop experience. Each year hundreds of students take the challenge and each year, we are blown away at how their camp experience becomes the catalyst to lasting change. We regularly hear back from students about how God used these booklets in their lives.

One student wrote: “…Last year I used to read my Bible every morning without really paying much attention to what I was reading. I think the challenge has taught me how to comprehend everything I read in the Bible. It was a great way to keep in touch with God every day! I learned that God loves everyone unconditionally (even the people you never would think he would) and that he wants us to share the good news with everyone!”

Another student perfectly captured our hope and prayer for these challenge booklets with these words:

“…I learned not only that God is the one I can turn to for anything, but that I am representative of Him here on Earth and I should be living out a life not solely glorifying Him, but also one in alignment with the plan He has for me. Thank you so much for putting together such a great book for me to take home and make my faith reconstruction last longer than the week I was at camp. The Challenge has given me the courage to start going back to church and join the youth group there as well.”

Often, students will ask us to send them more challenge books for friends and family:

“I learned that someday God will show us everything we don’t know and thought we knew, but will put the things we thought we knew into a brand new light to show us how great He is and how small and foolish we are. My love for Jesus (and how good these devotions were) motivated me to finish them. I was wondering if I could get two more. One for me and one for my best friend. Thank you so much! I feel I’m closer to God because of it.”

The impact of these challenge books has exceeded what we could have ever imagined. Our partnering churches regularly request more challenge books. One church even throws a party after their students complete the challenge booklets to celebrate what God has done, and is doing, in their lives. What an amazing blessing it is to be a part of God’s Kingdom work in the lives of students! Soli Deo Gloria!

For My Father’s Glory: Life & Service

Posted by & filed under LOG, Stories of Ministry, Volunteer.

What is Echo? Echo is a two-week program at Mount Hermon where students, grades 10 through Super Senior, learn and experience what it means to live the resounding life of abiding in Jesus Christ through prayer and obedience. Also, within the program, students work with the accommodations department. While working in accommodations, students learn what it means to humble themselves through service.

This year was my second year attending Echo but my 14th consecutive year coming to Mount Hermon. Out of all the years I have attended family camp, I strongly believe that Echo helped me grow one step closer to Jesus.

However, my first year at Echo was different compared to my second year growth wise. In my first year, I came in with a negative mentality about Christ. I grew up in the church but at that point in my life, I did not make my faith my own. In fact, I was far from believing in Christ. For the first two years of high school, I wanted to “do life” on my own terms and be the leader of my own life. Doing life on my own resulted in developing depression, becoming suicidal, trying to find acceptance and love through guys and becoming a chronic liar. I was self-conscious about what I looked like not only on the outside but the inside as well.

These things of my past are what drove my desire to not attend Echo. My parents, however, strongly encouraged me to go. During my two weeks; I learned that it’s more important to focus on God than on the past.  I also learned that “[Jesus Christ] is the true grapevine, and my Father is the gardener. He cuts off every branch of mine that doesn’t produce fruit, and He prunes the branches that do bear fruit so they will produce even more.” (John 15:1–2). Because our Father loves each of us so much, He prunes our imperfections away. When something in our lives is distancing us away from our Father, He cuts it off saying, “I love you my child; this part of you is no more.”

Natalie Loo Photo

Learning these things my first year at camp was beneficial. I came back home with a new perspective on life and God. However, this last year was particularly hard because I did not know how to continue my relationship with Christ at home. We did learn some tools that could help us, yes, but, the material did not fully sink in until my second year of doing Echo. For my second year of Echo, I knew that I had a relationship with Christ. However, it was my parent’s faith and not my own. Echo, this year taught me what is means to trust, love, and be patient with God and how God will love us despite all of the sins we have committed.

While in Echo, working in accommodations has helped with my relationship with Christ. I learned that it’s not about serving yourself but about serving our Heavenly Father in everything that we do.

It even says in Galatians 1:10, “Obviously, I’m not trying to win the approval of people, but of God. If pleasing people were my goal, I would not be Christ’s servant.” I remember one day in accommodations during my second year of Echo there was this cute family we encountered. They had a friend that was in surgery that same week they were at family camp. After my team was done with our accommodations shift for the day, we took the time to pray over that family and over the families at family camp. We were obeying God’s command of prayer for one another in brotherly love. Praying for the families wasn’t to boost anyone’s self-pride, it was about serving the people at Mount Hermon in our Father’s Holy Name.

Coming out of Echo a second time, I know that my faith in Jesus Christ is real and I want to keep pursuing Him for the rest of my life. I don’t know what God has in store for me, but I am praying and hoping that He will reveal his plans for me soon. Echo has helped me realize with school, taekwondo, or any extracurricular activity I participate in is for my Father’s glory.

Learn More About Echo!

Changed Perspective

Posted by & filed under Adventures, Adventures Updates, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Our staff are not all the same. I know that seems obvious, but it has been a profound opportunity that Mount Hermon Adventures has been able to embrace— the fact that our amazing staff is a complicated collection of individuals. We are all created in God’s image, loved and invited into relationship with Him, but some of our staff don’t know all that when they join our team.

In every interview process, we explain what Mount Hermon is, our mission, vision, values, heritage, and how we use adventure to invite people one step closer to Jesus. We open a conversation that some who we interview have never had—and even though they may not fully understand, they join our team of intentionally missional adventure staff. Every year we hire a handful of staff that don’t yet know Jesus and over the past seven years many of them have found Jesus because of their work at Mount Hermon.

Adam came to us in the hiring process humbly disclosing a background of some poor, adolescent choices that could cause some employers to shy away from hiring him. Impacted by his humility and openness, we asked him to join our team. At first, Adam worked primarily in our recreation area— helping overnight guests in the McAfee Fieldhouse, leading archery and helping with our community recreation leagues. He emerged as a hard worker, responsible, engaged and most of all questioning what made Mount Hermon different. As Adam continued to learn and grow in his position, he was also learning and growing as part of the Adventures staff community—participating in staff activities and building relationships with staff. He added skills to his repertoire by serving as a Redwood Canopy Tour guide, working on the adventure courses, and developing teams as a Team Building Facilitator.

One day, Adam called Laura Messerly, our Adventure Operations Director, to let her know that he was going to the doctor because of a toothache. The toothache led to the discovery that Adam had a brain tumor. He called to tell Laura the situation and was sad he wasn’t going to be able to work as much.

Upon receiving this devastating news, the Adventures staff rallied around Adam, prayed for him, assisted with care and meals, and showed him love. Initially, the doctors gave Adam a very low likelihood of survival—but Adam continued to join us for work as he was able through his brain surgery and chemotherapy treatment. It was during this dark time that Adam came to understand what a relationship with Jesus was all about, the saving knowledge of Grace, and the power of a loving Christian community.

Adam’s treatment went on for several months, and he continued to work as he was able, sharing his journey with us. His growth during this time was tremendous. His presence blessed staff and guests. Eventually, Adam won his battle with cancer and began the long road to recovery, gaining his strength and stamina back. As he began to discover that there was life ahead of him, he intentionally gave back to the Mount Hermon community by mentoring younger staff, leading by example, and even sharing his story at our men’s Boot Camp program.

After several years with Mount Hermon Adam’s time on staff drew to a close and we were sad to see him go, but excited about the next chapter of his life. About a year after Adam had left I ran into him at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk. He shared with me how grateful he was that we had hired him all those years ago and given him a chance when other employers might not have. He shared about how grateful he was for the community and the impact it had on his life and during his fight with cancer. Lastly, he wanted me to know how much being on staff at Mount Hermon had changed his life, and the lives of many other staff and that what we do was special and had great impact beyond the guests that we serve.

Adam’s story is just one of several where a staff member has encountered Jesus while working at Mount Hermon. We are honored and blessed to work with some of the most amazing people, experiencing grace and life-transformation together.

Adventures Photo

Kidder Creek Summer Review

Posted by & filed under Kidder Creek, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Rafting Photo

Summer 2016 was an incredible one at Kidder Creek because we got to serve over 1,600 campers (an almost 20% increase over 2015!) through outdoor adventures. We saw campers take one step closer to Jesus and have their lives forever transformed as they give their lives to Him. What an incredible opportunity!

Glory to God for the work that He is doing in the lives of campers that join us each summer at Kidder Creek, as they enjoy rafting, horseback riding, and daily adventures, they discover who God made them to be and learn how they fit in His plan to serve Him and others as they grow closer to Him.

  • Rock Climbing
  • Kidder Ride
  • Little Girl

Another highlight of this summer was adding Kidder Creek’s first-ever Mountain Bike Camp to the schedule. We filled the camp quickly and had a waiting list for this fun new camp. One camper said, “It was the best week of my life!”

Daily rides were the essence of the camp with rides at camp, the base of Mt. Shasta and Mt. Ashland. Summer 2017 will see a return of Mountain Bike Camp, with this upcoming year separating our Jr. High and High School Campers so that we can offer an even better experience. Many thanks to our volunteers who helped build trails, lead rides, drive the shuttle and do bike maintenance, we could not have done this camp without them.


“I found how God is showing us His love in great ways. I found myself doubting His existence but that completely changed. I am so non-doubting about my faith, and I am willing to give my life fully to Him and go serve the Lord in any way possible.”

BRANDEN, WILDERNESS ASCENT CAMPER


“If we marvel at creation we should marvel even more at the Creator.”

NICHOLAS, TIMBERLINE CAMPER

“I want to decide for myself that I believe in God.”

KELLY, TIMBERLINE CAMPER


“It has changed and probably saved my life.”

SAM, WIT CAMPER


The Samuelson Pavilion

Posted by & filed under Building Projects, General, LOG, Stories of Ministry.

Samuelson Pavilion Photo

On July 30, over 300 Redwood campers from past and present, staff, friends, and family all gathered under the Samuelson Pavilion to dedicate it to God’s glory and service. The Samuelson Pavilion has been a project of dreams for years, and this last summer came to fruition.

Dick Dosker, former Redwood Camp Director (1956–1989) captured the significance of the Pavilion during the dedication by saying, “Thank you all for the service in which you have given to this particular place of real estate which is hallowed ground. This new piece of equipment will help us move into the future of year-round ministry.”

“I love having the pavilion,” said current Redwood Camper D.J. Renwick. “When it’s foggy, or it’s raining or really sunny, we can play under here and it’s really nice.”

The Samuelson Pavilion sits nestled on the end of the meadow where redwoods provide the backdrop, the sound of the Ferndale Falls heard, the cabins seen, and relief from sun and rain felt. It provides a space for basketball, foosball, dodgeball and more. It also provides a great place to gather and meet with an open air feel.

  • Samuelson Pavilion
  • Samuelson Pavilion

“In many ways—Play is the gateway to a child’s heart,” said current Redwood Camp Director, Chafer Cox. “We close the week with our Luminaria. Campers spread out all over the field and under the pavilion. This is where many kids accept Christ for the first time and discover God’s unconditional love for them, (as they look back over the week and make some incredible decisions and take part in life-changing conversations). Last night, one cabin of seven girls all accepted Christ right here under the pavilion.”


“I love to build. I love taking the plans and making them come to life. We listen to the Master Builder. He leads us to build places and spots to worship.”


The Samuelson Family and staff also attended the dedication. “I love to build. I love taking the plans and making them come to life,” said Jack Samuelson. “We listen to the Master Builder. He leads us to build places and spots to worship.”

Jack has a long history with Mount Hermon having been on the board of directors and attending Mount Hermon events. “He [Jack] feels loved here,” said Jack’s son Reid Samuelson. “We feel loved here, and I’m sure that everyone who passes through here gets the same feeling. So we’re very proud, very honored to be a part of this project.”

“We want our grandchildren and all young people to understand that living is about giving and not getting,” said Jack. “It is about concern for others and living in the warm glow of God’s eternal, loving care.”

There was also no better weekend to dedicate the pavilion than the same weekend as the Redwood Staff Reunion. Over 140 former Redwood Staff from the 40’s to the present came from far and wide to revisit and reconnect with such a unique and meaningful time in their lives.

Bill (Llama) Vezey reflects back on his experience as a summer staffer at Redwood in the 80’s. “Redwood Camp, in particular, was, no exaggeration, my salvation. I was headed down a dark and self-absorbed road. Living in a community, summer after summer, that required mutual reliance in a place of such explicit prayer and service turned my ship around. I am forever grateful to Dick and Barb Dosker who took a chance on me and let me come back a second summer. And a third. And so on.”

“We’ve all been part of this,” said Ron Taylor, former Redwood Camp Director (1998–2009) during the ceremony. “I believe that this building is in good hands because the people who are serving at Mount Hermon love God and dream big.”

Whisper Canyon Spared from the Chimney Fire

Posted by & filed under General, LOG, Whisper Canyon.

 

“If the fire had come up the canyon even three hours earlier, we’d have had to pull out, and Whisper Canyon would have been lost.” Camp Hosts Larry and Jennifer Lewis heard those words while being given a comprehensive post-fire tour of the camp by a Ventura fire captain. Instead by 1:00pm on August 22, when a 60-foot wall of flames raced up the canyon, several firefighter crews HAD arrived! By the Lord’s mercy, temperatures had cooled, the fog was forming, and the winds had dropped. twelveyear Family Camp veteran Randy Martin’s fire crew joined in from Camp Roberts, and through the night they fought the fire back, saving the Campground. The “Chimney Fire” burned for 25 days, consuming 46,000 acres, 49 homes, and 21 structures. It burned to within 15 feet of our “yurt” cabins.


“If the fire had come up the canyon even three hours earlier, we’d have had to pull out, and Whisper Canyon would have been lost.”


The two primary residences on the property and all eight Yurts have “open” foundations, and flames can easily be sucked underneath. The fire crews used our camp mowers, brush cutters, chainsaws, and shovels to clear areas around these structures, and near our propane tanks and water systems, setting “backfires” which pulled the flames away. In the end, not one yurt even had an ember land on it, and the surrounding pine trees were untouched. So, why were all those fire crews at Whisper Canyon? Because, again by the Lord’s provision three years ago, a volunteer named Emmet, donating his expertise and a week on his motor grader, had converted a sloped area into a full-size soccer field—it was a perfect “staging zone” for these crews. Emmet saved Mount Hermon over $25,000 on that project and having that open field available also saved the camp. Whisper Canyon gave hundreds of firefighters a bivouac spot and allowed them the use of bathrooms and the yurt bunk beds. Once the roads opened, a team of volunteers came and worked with Larry and Jennifer to scrub all the ashes from inside and outside the yurts. They cleaned the bath facilities and cleared the brush fire crews had cut to help divert the fire. One guest group had to cancel, but when we tried to send their refund, they said, “No, just reschedule us for September!” Groups have returned to this peaceful place of rest amid the beauty of God’s creation. And for a while, they’ll see the evidence of God’s grace, a whisper in the canyon where the Lord brought His rescuers.

  • Whisper Canyon Fire
  • Whisper Canyon Fire