Posts Categorized: Writers Conference

Making Your Speculative Story World Unique

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Kathy Tyers GillinBLOGGER: KATHY TYERS GILLIN

A freelance author, mentor and editor, Kathy will serve as a fiction mentor for the Morning Mentoring Clinic and teach an Afternoon Workshop.

 

MAKING YOUR SPECULATIVE STORY WORLD UNIQUE

People who write fantasy and science fiction read a lot of it. We love the way it lets us stand outside life-as-we-know-it and look at what it means to be human in this world. And as authors, we tend to imitate what we’ve read.

That means it can be a little too easy to recycle the common tropes of speculative fiction: dragons that can be ridden, planets that have gravity so close to earth-normal that people can walk unassisted, spaceships that go BOOM when they blow up. Last year at Mount Hermon, I passed out a cliché list I’d found online—and since it’s well-nigh impossible to tell a readable story without using any well-established ideas, I had to confess I’d written many of them into my books.

But in a speculative story, not everything unusual should come out of the consensus universe. How can we add something new to the conversation?

Try brainstorming across different disciplines.

  • Combine botany and culture to imagine the farming community of an imagined era or planet
  • Mingle the culinary arts with microbiology to imagine new fermented foods.
  • Cross anatomy with aerodynamics, and create fantasy dragons that people really could ride.
  • What about combining speculative geology with architecture and homebuilding?
  • Or applying your imagined culture’s history to the planet’s orbital cycle, to create a believable list of holidays?
  • The possibilities are endless.

You might discover that mingling seemingly unrelated crafts and sciences is just as much fun as using the results to deepen your story—so don’t get carried away! Remember story is character in conflict.  That’s why 90% of your scientific brainstorming won’t be explained in the story.

The deeper and wider your knowledge pool, the more interesting the ideas that might come swimming past. Speculative fiction’s target audience tends to be bright, introverted, and well-read in what’s already published. They’ll know where we borrowed our ideas, if we only borrow.

So add something fresh to the conversation. Some day, when other writers borrow your fresh ideas, you’ll know they aren’t just acknowledging Tolkien or George Lucas, C.S. Lewis or J.K. Rowling. They have also acknowledged you.

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Come meet Kathy Tyers Gillin at the the 43rd Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Click here to REGISTER NOW!

Nailing the 3 C’s of the Writing Sample

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MickSilva_2 (800x577)BLOGGER: MICK SILVA

A freelance editor and mentor, Mick will speak at the opening Friday afternoon session, serve as a fiction mentor for the Pre-Conference Next Level Clinic, and on the Critique Team during the main conference at the 2016 Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference in March.

 

NAILING THE 3 C’s OF THE WRITING SAMPLE

This is the best advice I have on writing the sample, the first 30 pages included with the proposal. I promise.

And I give it to you now, free of charge. I can personally guarantee it’s better than anything else out there on this because it goes further and encompasses more. I’ve done my research,recommendations here. For memoir, get my ebook and as part of the professional community of book developers, I know my competition. And just for fun, if you don’t agree this is better than a similar piece on this topic, please send me a link and I’ll see to it that you’re destroyed, er, fairly compensated for your time and effort.

I considered calling this post “The C-3 for Writing Your Sample,” as in C-3, the dangerous plastic explosive. But I wondered if enough people know what C-3 is. And it turns out C3 in military terms can also refer to “command, control, and communications,” which is neither relevant nor particularly amusing. So if it helps here to think of a pliable gray substance used in blowing things up, have at it. I’m using 3 C’s that are just as powerful and equally deadly to editors and agents who come across them in proposal samples at writers conferences.

Ready? Content, Craft and Community.

Boom.

Okay, why are these are the 3 big categories to focus on, the 3 essential things I look for to see if an author has nailed the writing sample?

 

Content

Content refers to the concept you’re promoting. It reveals your specific belief about that idea, your unique take on it, and your expertise as a representative. There’s a lot to unpack in that definition, so I’ll elucidate (and don’t worry: understanding craft and community is a whole lot easier).

First, identify what you’re selling. My vision form can help a lot here (it’s free: micksilva.com/define-the-vision) by distilling your idea to the felt need it most directly answers. There’s always a “best way” to say things, and an explosive concept will reveal a unique specific answer to a big, well-defined problem. Mark that. Even with fiction, if you read the back cover or endorsements you’ll see this kind of thing: “Dazzling!” “Masterful!” “Full of the universal longing for freedom,” “Restored my hope in humanity…”

Those words describe the big need that that book solved.

Of course, a proposal builds this case, so the writing sample is less about the content than proving your craft. But it does need to show you’ve worked to define your target. So ask yourself, How will people describe this? And how does this sample speak to deep needs?

Remember, often, our first ideas, or second or third, are not good enough. You’ve got to dig deeper than surface-level and initial impressions. People will find what you say compelling when you go further, dive deeper, look harder. Show you’re committed to this message for the long haul.

And since it’s very difficult to know if your concept is compelling enough, we need to move on to refining (that you’re committed is plenty good for now).

 

Craft

If your idea is compelling, you’ll know it by how people respond to the sample. Craft refers to how well your sample is written—which of course means how well it’s been rewritten, edited and polished. First-time authors, get professional content editing, line-editing, copyediting and proofing—four separate editors with good experience and a track record (expensive, I know, but so is publishing a sub-par book). Pro editing is increasingly critical in ensuring work that’s clear, concise and above all, complete.

Even if the sample hooks an editor, he or she will likely need the full book to prove you can deliver.

If your first 30 pages demonstrate your book will stand out amongst the dozens of other books just like it, it will be because it reflects your 1) research and 2) reduction of what doesn’t connect to your central point or theme. Again, several books on editing can help (see above) you make it your best before professional editing.

There’s some overlap between content and craft since “content editing” is often needed to determine the right focus and that distractions are eliminated. But this is also why, unequivocally, the right editor can be your most important step in building your community.

 

Community

Who do you have around you helping create, campaign and convince people to read your work? (Sorry, I must like C’s.)

Every writer needs endorsers and partners who will commit to be vocal about your book. Be sure to refer back to my other post on writing the proposal using your “heart goal.” Taken together, they cover all you need to prepare your work for the conference.

For many writers, building community is some of their hardest work. If that’s you, you’re not alone. You just have to be diligent and be yourself. If you’re a quiet type like me, do things that aren’t too taxing. Get help from your more extroverted friends and remember if your goal is to help more people with your work, you have to mention it and ask for help with that.

I’m not a good model here, but I’m getting better. Who you know is absolutely how popular authors succeed. I’m actually discovering building community isn’t that hard if you commit to helping people, and what I learn about myself in the process is a great hidden reward.

Success comes in knowing what you value by having worked through that yourself. And a community of like-minded, passionate professionals is an often-unspoken-but-vital key to writing that sample that’s keenly insightful and based in a broad experience (you’ll also hear people say reading is important, which is definitely true too).

This coming year at Mount Hermon I’ll be taking a small group of novelists through these steps in the Pre-Conference Next Level Clinics. I hope to read some exciting, edgy samples full of bold commitment and insight.

And if I get my ultimate wish, I’ll find that one explosive work I could see submitting to an agent or editor eager to be blown away.

 

Which of the 3 Cs do you think you most need to work on–Content, Craft, or Community?

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Come meet Mick Silva at the 43rd annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 16-22, 2016.

Click here to REGISTER NOW!

Workarounds: Finding an Agent

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Wendy LawtonBLOGGER: WENDY LAWTON

Literary Agent and Vice President of Books & Such Literary Management

Co-Teaching a One-Hour Workshop and serving on the Agent Panel.

WORKAROUNDS: FINDING AN AGENT

Too often we hear writers mourning the “fact” that one can’t get published without an agent (which is not true) and that it’s near impossible to find an agent in this seemingly shrinking market.

Anytime the front door to a problem seems blocked, I like to find a workaround. Let’s look at the problem and see if we can figure out the workaround.

Problem: Catching the attention of an agent and getting him to ask for a proposal or manuscript.

Traditional Solution: Write a smashing query letter, send it to multiple agents and hold your breath.

Workaround: Meet the agent or publishing professional in person. Sounds complicated, but it’s not. And we’re not talking about the fabled literary dinner parties and salons of Maxwell Perkins, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway.

A century ago, people didn’t travel like we do today. Writers, agents & editors gather together in person more than ever before. Forget the dinner party, you can now spend an entire week with your favorite publishing professionals, practice the craft and learn about the business of writing. Agents and editors are committed to making ourselves available at writer’s conferences. It’s my favorite way to meet writers who are willing to invest time, energy and fiscal resources in their careers. I’m preparing for the Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference in three months. It’s still one of my favorite weeks of the whole year.

Simple fact: Agents attend writers conferences to meet new writers. The good conferences give us plenty of time to connect with writers. Mount Hermon is one of my favorites. In addition to the appointments we schedule, we share seven or eight meals with writers. Those relationships forged around a table of eight are the basis for many a professional relationship.

It may take a number of different face-to-face meetings until your target agent decides he can’t live without you, but there is something about that real-time connecting that overshadows the traditional methods. It’s the perfect workaround.

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Come meet Wendy Lawton at the Mount Hermon, March 18-22, 2016, where she’ll participate in a couple of workshops, review pre-conference manuscripts, and meet with writers!

Are you looking for the agent who is right for you? Eight agents plan to join us at Mount Hermon in the spring. I hope you’ll consider doing so, too.

Click here to REGISTER.

Success! Are You Ready?

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Tamela Hancock Murray
BLOGGER: TAMELA HANCOCK MURRAY

A Literary Agent with The Steve Laube Agency, Tamela will teach an Afternoon Workshop, participate in an Agents Q&A, and meet with potential clients at the 2016 Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference in March.

SUCCESS! ARE YOU READY?

Recently one of the faithful readers of The Steve Laube Agency blog asked if I would write a blog on how to handle success. Here are a few of my thoughts, in no particular order:

Once you are successful, prepare to…

Be gracious. Whether you struggled for years to be published or if you’ve never heard the word “no” from an agent or editor, when writing in public forums or speaking in a group setting, always temper your enthusiasm about your success. No doubt and you simply want your friends to celebrate with you. We all want that. But in a public forum, there will always be the person your success makes feel small, and words that can be interpreted as boasting can hurt, no matter how pure your heart.

Deal with backbiting. Since we live in a fallen world, even if you are the most gracious and lovely person you can be, someone will be envious of you. Someone will say your writing stinks. You may never hear this. Or you might. Either way, keep walking with God, and realize that writing touches the gamut of emotions. We cannot control responses to our writing. No one is immune to criticism. Don’t believe me? We just celebrated Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice for us, His crucifixion brought about by His actions — and His words.

Realize that people who were never on your team still won’t be. We’d all like to think that if only we could appear on TV and become rich and famous, we could finally prove our critics wrong. Nope. They’ll just hate you more. Don’t worry about them. Enjoy your true friends. You know who they are.

Adjust your financial plan. You may receive no advance, a four-figure advance, or an advance large enough to make a real difference in your life. But please remember, you will be taxed on that advance and any royalties so hold back at least 30% for when the tax bill arrives. And if you are using an advance to live on, make sure to budget so that the money will last well past the date you can expect your next payment on your contract. Unsure of how to handle your new finances? Your local bank should be able to help you find professional help so you can form a plan. Bottom line: it’s easy to spend a fortune so don’t get caught short on money if you can avoid it.

Be watched. People who never looked your way before may suddenly notice you. You may gain more friends than if you had just issued a public invitation to a vacation home on the beach. Enjoy the popularity, but keep a balance of how much to let others into your life so you don’t become overwhelmed. This is a good time to solidify friendships you already have with other published authors and get a few tips from them on how to form boundaries with fans.

Expand your social media presence. Now more than ever, you will need to communicate with fans. Set up a schedule for Twitter, Facebook, and your newsletter and/or blog. Remind fans that you are still writing, and keep them up to date on important events in your life so they will feel as though you are a friend. Don’t hawk your books, though. Let readers find you and your books, although letting your fans know when your publisher is offering a free download can be a great idea.

Be asked to speak. Speaking engagements may start coming your way. If you need to hone your public appearance skills, many people recommend Toastmasters http://www.toastmasters.org/.

 Master time management. You will no longer have the luxury of taking as long as you want to write a book. You will have relentless deadlines — several with each book. Be prepared to meet them all and schedule your time accordingly.

Be with those you love. Make spending time doing fun activities with everyone you love a priority.

Enjoy your success!

Do you have other suggestions for those experiencing success?

______________________

Come meet Tamela Hancock Murray at the 47th annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Click here to register. 

Procrastination: Muse & Writer

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BLOGGER: ANGELA BREIDENBACH

Angela will teach an Afternoon Workshop and serve on the Critique Team at the Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Angela Muse Image

 

PROCRASTINATION: MUSE & WRITER

Muse: No.

Writer: But I’ll just watch the news while I eat on break.

Muse: You are on deadline. No.

Writer: Hand over the remote. Please.

Muse: You want to reach your goal, focus on the little tasks.

Writer: 15 minutes won’t matter.

Muse: But you won’t stop there.

Writer: I bet I can–

Muse: Go ahead – try to take them.

Writer: You wouldn’t…

Muse: Try me.

Writer: Fine, I’ll just go write then.

Muse: I’m sure you made the best choice…

 

Ever had a similar conversation with your self, uh, your muse?

_________________

Angela BreidenbachCome meet 2016 faculty member Angela Breidenbach at the conference, March 18-22.

Click here to register.

Podcasting for Writers and Authors

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John VonhofBLOGGER: JOHN VONHOF

Manuscript Retrieval Coordinator

 

PODCASTING FOR WRITERS AND AUTHORS

Writers want to write. Between query letters and proposals, research, one or more manuscripts in various degrees of completion, critique groups – we keep pretty busy. Then we learn that as writers, published or not, we should have our own website. And of course, if we are published, we need to do marketing. And whether published or not, we need to be working on building our platform. Building your platform can take many forms: websites, blogs, speaking, article writing, events – and more. For years, blogs were seen as the “must have” for writers. Then along came podcasting. Statistics from 2014 revealed that for every 1,700 bloggers, there was one podcaster. It’s a very small, wide-open arena for those wanting to build an even larger platform.

Podcasting in simple terms is often called on-demand radio – generally without the advertisements. A more detailed definition of a podcast is a digital medium consisting of an episodic series of audio files subscribed to and downloaded through web syndication or streamed online to a computer or mobile device. It allows anyone to become a radio announcer, talk show host and a recording artist in just a snap. The majority of podcasts are listened to on mobile devices, with Apple’s iPhone leading Android phones by a five to one margin. Podcasts can be listened to anywhere and anytime: commuting, cooking, gardening, exercising, and walking – anywhere you have time to fill. I listen while I ride my bike and run. Apple’s iPhone has a built-in podcast app. Android phones can download podcasts through the Stitcher radio app. Shows can be listened to on the podcast host’s website, online in iTunes or Stitcher, or better yet, subscribe to the podcast and you’ll automatically get each episode downloaded directly to your smartphone or tablet. Podcast can be listened to at 1.5 speed, allowing you to hear more in less time. I find listening at 2x or higher makes it hard to understand the content.

Anyone can start a podcast and it can be incorporated into any WordPress website. Podcasting can be done with relatively inexpensive equipment – your computer, earbuds from your smartphone, and a website. There are podcasts about podcasting, teaching listeners about equipment, interview and hosting techniques, editing, where to host your podcast, software and WordPress plug-ins, publicity and marketing, and more. In addition, there are websites offering the same information through free and paid courses about starting a podcast.

There are many options in podcasting. You can do a solo show or find one or more people to co-host with you. There are different formats: monologue, interview, back and forth banter with a co-host, and questions and answers are the most common. You determine the frequency of releasing new shows. Most podcasts are weekly, but some are twice a week. Shows can be any length. My shows are interview style. I edit my own shows and create a blog post page for each show.

Writers and authors can host a podcast about whatever interests them and they think will interest others. Fiction authors can do shows about their writing, how they do research, character and plot development, dialogue, and more. Non-fiction authors can record shows about their writing topics, research, style and structure, sections within their books, choosing topics, and more. Both of these, and poets and devotional writers, can read selections from their writing and dissect the content. Talk about motivation, writing skills and techniques that help you, finding time to write, and more. Give it a unique slant and title, determine your audience, decide on the format, practice recording, and then get set to go live.

In addition to my podcast, Writers & Authors on Fire, there are other faculty members at the conference who have podcasts. Kathi Lipp’s podcast is You’ve Got This with Kathi Lipp, Erin Taylor and Karen Ball co-host their Write From the Deep podcast, and Angela Breidenbach hosts Grace Under Pressure Radio. I know any of us would be willing to answer your podcasting questions. Kathi is also teaching a workshop on podcasting. I’m in the manuscript retrieval center during the conference and would be happy to share resources and help you brainstorm about whether podcasting could help build your platform, and possible topics.

I encourage you to listen to a few of the shows of the above podcasts before the conference. They are available through iTunes and Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podcasting app. You’ll be surprised at the variety of show topics and what you’ll learn.

________________________

Come meet John Vonhof at the 47th annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

If you’re interested in learning more about podcasting, plan to attend Kathi Lipp’s afternoon workshop, Beginner’s Guide to Podcasting.

Click here to Register Now!

Become a Published Author by Writing Short Stories That Sell

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B.J. Taylor.2BLOGGER: B.J. TAYLOR

Editorial Representative, Guideposts Magazine

Teaching an Afternoon Workshop, Reviewing Pre-Conference Manuscripts and meeting with writers at the 2016 Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference, March 18-22.

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR BY WRITING SHORT STORIES THAT SELL

You want to write novels. Me, too! But something happened along the way in my writing career. I became good at writing short stories that sell. And it helps me write novels. No kidding.

Here’s what happens when you write short stories:

It teaches you to write tight. If you can write a beginning, middle, and end in 1,200 to 1,500 words that captivate and entertain a reader, you can sell short stories. And with that, you have the ability to write a novel (which is a beginning, middle, and end). Think of your novel as also captivating and entertaining a reader one chapter at a time.

It teaches you to work with an editor. Every story you submit for publication goes through an editor who will work with you to make the story acceptable for the publication. You might be asked to make changes, delete some of your precious sentences, or cut a paragraph or two. When you graciously work with an editor, you build a reputation for being a joy to work with.

It teaches you to meet deadlines. Submissions must be received by a drop-dead date. Writing for a short story publication will help you to focus on a deadline and meet it.

It provides you with a byline. Seeing your name in print never gets old, even for me after 40 stories published in the Chicken Soup for the Soul books, multiple bylines in other magazines, and even on my nonfiction books. The fact that you’re a published author is huge! It will help you to snare an agent and even a publisher. Many will ask you where you’ve been published. If you can list your success, it’s a true bonus.

It provides you with an income. Hey, making $200 for a short story (or more depending on the market), is a lot more than fish bait. I never sneeze at an opportunity to sell my writing because every dollar counts in today’s expensive world. Would you agree?

It provides you with a shot in the arm. There isn’t anything better than feeling really good as a writer. And being published accomplishes that. As you toil on your novel writing, short story sales keep your spirits high and your enthusiasm soaring.

For more information on the formula used successfully by many short story writers, see the book on Amazon, P MS to a T: the Winning Formula for Writing Nonfiction Short Stories that Sell.

_________________

Come meet B.J. Taylor at the 47th annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Ready to learn more about writing essays and short stories for periodicals? Plan to attend Jesse Florea’s Major Morning Track ~ Magazine Writing: Starting Point or Destination?

Click here to register.

Why Are Children’s Books Important?

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Linda Howard (800x534)BLOGGER: LINDA HOWARD

Acquisitions Editor, Children and Youth, Tyndale House Publishers

Teaching an Afternoon Workshop

Reviewing Pre-Submission Manuscripts for Editorial Review and Meeting with Writers.

 

WHY ARE CHILDREN’S BOOKS IMPORTANT?

I have loved to read since I can remember. My mom loved to read as well. She modeled her enthusiasm for books to me and encouraged me to read regularly. I did the same for my daughter, even reading to her during my pregnancy, and she has grown to be a delightful young woman who regularly devours books and shares that passion with her children. I look back and see the strong influence of books in my family, and am grateful for their impact on my life from a young age.

These days, as a publisher, I have the joy of helping to create books that will be read by thousands of children around the world. I have a great sense of responsibility, purpose, and satisfaction in bringing formative stories to the market for kids. Why is it so important to provide quality, engaging stories for kids? I’ll outline a few of the top reasons below.

  1. Reading builds a stronger vocabulary in children. Descriptive language, emotive expression, and more are added to a child’s toolbox as they read books and learn new words that aren’t always used in their everyday conversations.
  2. Expanding a child’s imagination is another benefit of reading. Watching a child’s face light up as they “get” what is going on in a story is captivating. Hearing them describe a story in their own words after reading it can be hilarious, heart wrenching, illuminating, and just plain fun.
  3. Reading as a child also tends to lead to more success later on in life. Many studies show that students who are exposed to reading before preschool stand a much greater chance of excelling in all areas of their education including math, science, and communication skills – reading, writing, and verbal communication.
  4. Family reading time creates a special bond between children and their parents or grandparents. Time spent sitting together, reading and discussing books, helps to develop a bond not easily broken. I read to my daughter with her sitting in my lap when she was young, and then read alongside her as she grew up. When she got too big for my lap, I read the same books she was reading, and we talked about them afterwards. She is married and has children of her own now, but we still share books with each other.
  5. Reading helps children develop logical thinking skills. Because children tend to learn best through stories, the more they read the more they are better able to understand abstract concepts, develop problem solving skills as they watch characters in the books deal with issues, and understand the impact of cause and effect in various situations.

Books are powerful tools in building a child’s social, emotional, and educational skills. Make it a priority to expose the children in your life to quality literature. And enjoy it with them – you will both see benefits for a lifetime!

______________________

Come meet Linda Howard at the 43rd annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference.

Click here to Register Now!

 

Small Houses Offer Big First Choices

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Ann Byle smallerBLOGGER: ANN BYLE

A Literary Agent with Credo Communications, Ann will teach an Afternoon Workshop, participate in an Agents Q&A, and meet with potential clients at the 2016 Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference in March.

 

SMALL HOUSES OFFER BIG FIRST CHOICES

Publishing is difficult these days as publishers work hard to do more with less. Big houses are struggling to create sales in a market that isn’t buying as readily, reach readers whose attention wanders, and attract authors with monster platforms that promise big sales.

As publishers tighten their belts and raise the bar for authors, more and more writers are seeking publication. As an agent, I receive queries in my inbox sometimes once a day, including Saturday and Sunday. Sadly, most of these authors have little chance of getting a contract with a big, traditional Christian publishing house. Even authors with previously published books and a good platform have no guarantees.

Small publishers, once considered second best, are stepping into the widening gap between big houses and author contracts, offering authors publication credits and royalties. Here are a couple of reasons to consider a small house for your novel or nonfiction title.

  1. Small houses are more open to debut authors. One of my clients recently signed a contract with a growing house for her debut novel. The publisher was delighted with her writing and didn’t much care about her medium-sized platform.
  2. Small houses are great for niche-market books. A big house isn’t going to take on a book that reaches a relatively small market (such as parenting a special needs child or caring for elderly parents), but a small house can recognize the need for such a book and offer a contract.
  3. Small houses don’t need huge sales to make a profit. Of course small houses want to sell a lot of books, but they don’t need sales of 15-20,000 to break even. In fact, many small houses are thrilled with sales of 2,000 to 5,000. Which means they’ll look at books that will sell that many, thus allowing authors of really good books to find a home.
  4. Small houses offer personalized service. You won’t get lost in a sea of new books published the same time as yours, or in a backlist so vast it’s impossible to find your book. Usually a small house can devote a decent amount of attention to your book and you, offering advice and help when you need it.
  5. Small houses provide an avenue for sales. Authors can accrue good digital and print sales, which can mean additional book contracts and additional sales. If sales are large enough, a bigger house may take notice. Some authors, however, may want to stay with that smaller house for its personal service and good relationships.
  6. Small houses help authors build a deep contact list. Any author worth his or her salt will use their publication with a small house to build an email list, blog following, or website visit tally. A vital and growing contact list is worth more than gold, as any author and publisher knows.

As you research book publishers, consider a smaller house. These houses often offer the same benefits of a big house—marketing and publicity help, distribution network, quality editing and cover design—with a much more open acceptance policy. A small house may be the perfect fit for you.

_______________________

Come meet Ann Byle at the 47th annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Click here to Register Now!

Taming Time–Practical Tips to Increase Writing Productivity

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BLOGGER: SARAH SUNDIN

Historical novelist Sarah Sundin will serve as a mentor for the Morning Mentoring Clinic, teach an Afternoon Workshop, and serve on the Critique Team at the Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Sarah Sundin Taming Time image

 

“How on earth did you find time to write a book?” a friend asked.

Perhaps it was my ability to type at the speed of light or my complete lack of a personal life.

Um, no. Snails type faster than I do, and they don’t have fingers. I’m a mother of three, teach Sunday school, and have a part-time job. But I make time to write.

Four tools for increasing productivity are herding up goals, corralling blocks of time, lassoing the on-line beast, and harnessing snippets of time. Honestly, I don’t write Westerns.

Herd Up Goals

We’ve all been there—we finish a busy week and have nothing to show for it. Setting goals is the best way to prevent this. Even if you aren’t published yet, make deadlines. Set yearly goals, then break those goals down by month. At the beginning of each week, set daily goals. My goal sheet hangs over my desk. Staring at me.

Corral Blocks of Time

“I am a professional. I am a professional.” Repeat until you believe it.

Now, act like it. Keep office hours, no matter how short, and use them well. Review the day’s goals and get to work. No excuses, no distractions, no phone calls.

Having children at home complicates things, but even a toddler can learn to respect office hours. Despite what parenting blogs say, a child does not need constant entertainment—in fact, a child who learns to entertain himself becomes imaginative and independent.

Lasso the Internet

E-mail, blogs, Twitter, Facebook—they’re necessary, but they can drain away that time you corralled.

Designate a time for the internet, working with your schedule and personality. Reserve your best time of the day for writing and your less-productive times for the internet.

Then set strict time limits. A kitchen timer works wonders.

Harness Time Snippets

A great way to boost productivity is by using snippets of time while waiting at the soccer field or doctor’s office. Why not use that “wasted” time?

Here are some things you can do in ten minutes:

  • Research

As a writer of historical fiction, I always have a pile of books to read. A book and note paper, and I’m set.

  • Market Research

Study magazines or websites you’d like to target or read a book in your genre.

  • Pre-write

Outline an article or chapter, fill out character charts, or write a synopsis.

  • Edit

Editing is my favorite on-the-go activity, well suited to interruptions.

  • Critiques

Time snippets are great for reviewing your critique partners’ work.

  • Communications

With a smartphone, you can tackle e-mails and social media on the run—and free up time at home.

  • Publicity

Public writing means free publicity. People will ask what you’re doing. So tell them. Make sure you always bring business cards or bookmarks.

  • Write

Use a time snippet to write. Really. Try it.

How can you improve your time management?

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Meet Sarah Sundin at the 47th annual Mount Hermon Christian Writers’ Conference, March 18-22, 2016.

Click here to Register Now!